General running information and thoughts from a guy who has gone around the track too many times.

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Lydiard Levels I & II Coaches Certification

May 9 – 11

LYDIARD TRAINING is the most sophisticated coaching method ever developed and the most widely used system worldwide by both recreational and professional endurance athletes.

This course gives detailed Theory and Application of Lydiard training, including

* The Five Energy Developmental Phases,

* The Lydiard Principles

* The Essential Timing Considerations that prepare the runner for peak performances when it counts, year after year.

Participants learn not only the what, how and why of each training session but the Secret of Correct Sequencing that greatly amplifies the Training Effect. Coaches and their athletes will have the means to reset their sights to season after season of stellar performances. Attendees are invited to participate in demo sessions of specialty workouts.

COURSE HOURS

  * Friday May 9th:  6:30 – 8:30 pm

  * Saturday May 10th:  9 am – 5 pm

  * Sunday May 11th:  9 am – 3 pm

COURSE CONTENT

Evening Session6.30pm – 8:30 pm

  * Introductions

  * The Lydiard Lineage: A history of Arthur Lydiard and the influence of his training methods worldwide

  * Debunking Myths and Misconceptions

  * Video

Day Two: 9am – 5pm

  * The Five Essential Lydiard Principles

  * Energy Pathways: ATP, Mitochondria and Energy Production for Endurance Sports

  * Overview of the Training Pyramid

  * The Adaptation Curve

  * Starting off on the Right Foot: Pre‐training phases, Health Considerations, Leg‐Building

  * VO2 Max: Estimator and other measurements, VDOT scale and Race Prediction, The VO2 Max Interview

  * Aerobic Conditioning: How to Build a Base, the Physiology of the Long Run

  * Muscle Fiber Recruitment

  * Nuts and Bolts: Strides, Fartlek, The Out and Back Run, Progress Calibration Run

  * Hill Training: Application, the Foot Spring, Workout Variations and demo

  * Q & A and Discussion

Day Three: 9am  – 3pm

  * Essential Recovery Indicators

  * Overcoming Over-training: Signs and Remedies: Diet, Acid/alkaline balance, hormones, Illness, weight, sleep, adrenal function

  * Interval Training

  * Coordination Phase: Balancing aerobic & anaerobic

  * Speedwork and Sharpening

  * TaperTweaking and Peaking: Race Week/Non Race‐week plan

  * Racing and Pacing Considerations

  * Race Recovery Factors

  * Macro-cycles: Planning considerations. Training Modulation. Designing long‐term plans.

  * Designing a Daily Training Plan

  * The Art of Adapting Lydiard Training to the individual

  * Q & A and Discussion

 

Details

Start: May 9, 2014
End: May 11, 2014

Organizer: Lori McConnell with West Seattle Runner

Phone: (206) 938-0545
Email: lorimcconnell@hotmail.com
Website: http://www.westseattlerunner.com

WSRunner

Venue:  Camp Long, West Seattle, Washington

Phone:
(206) 684-7434
5200 35th Ave SW Seattle, WA 98126 United States

+ Google Map

Website:  http://www.seattle.gov/parks/environment/camplong.htm

Tickets

Early Bird Special $315 This is the discounted price if registered before 4/9/2014.
Lydiard Certificate I&II for RRCA coaches $300 RRCA certified coaches will receive a discount.
Lydiard Certificate I&II $350
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OMG, what has happened to January?

I mean we are a few days away from the beginning of February. Where has all the days gone?

This means I best get busy.

Besides going to work and family life, which is all great, here is a quick review of January’s highlights.

* Finish the First Call Marathon with son Ammon on January 1. Finish time: 3:54. Not to shabby and a great way to start the new year. Downside to this event was running by the Red Hook Brewery four times – without stopping.

* Started a three month commitment as Lego Coach to a group of 6 year-olds, including grandson Finn. Being a Lego Coach is very similar to herding cats who are playing with Legos. First order of Coach duties is to separate the difficult Lego pieces. Trust me, 6 year-olds are not very patience. Good thing is most know how to tie their shoes.

* Granddaughter Harper turned 4! As a gift Shelly and I took her to the American Girl Doll Store in Lynnwood. It was a horrific interesting experience. I have never seen so much pink and so many freaky looking dolls in one place in all of my life. Did I say it was horrific interesting?

American Girl Doll Store

Nightmare on Doll Street

* Seattle Seahawks are going to the Super Bowl. Just want to point out that Shelly and I move to Seattle and the Hawks go to the Super Bowl. Coincidence? I think not. The whole Seattle Gilbert Clan have been enjoying all the games leading up to Super Bowl Sunday. Go Hawks!

For Super Bowl Sunday we will be enjoying my home made chili, which is becoming a football tradition. Well, we have had it once, with enjoyment.

 

Running is going pretty good. Wish I running more miles than I am, but . . . there is February.

See you on the roads.

 


I ran 331 miles in 12 days.

Not all at one time.

In May I ran 167 miles in 7 days from Vernal, Utah to Steamboat Springs, Colorado. In August I ran 164 miles in 6 days from Mahoney City, Pennsylvania to New York City, New York. All for MS Run the US Relay.

I learned a lot about myself and about running.

Want to learn what I learned?

Keep reading.

  1. Getting started. Sometimes when you first wake-up and realize you need to run long, the mind starts telling you all the reasons why you can’t. Leave it to the mind and you’ll stay in bed. I found that getting my feet moving was the key to waking the mind up to what my body could actually do. When the brain gets on board anything can happen.
  2. Real Food is good. That just seems silly to say, but it’s totally true. I have tired most name brand sports drink, gels and the what-have-yous. Running magazines are full of ads that tells us what products works best. My truth is that sports-aid-items do not work for me. I have found that real food in the form of fruits, oatmeal, raisins, nuts, whole grains, and potato chips (I realize that potato chips might not be considered a real food, but it doesn’t come out of a tube) really works for me. I also like water over sport drinks. And Coke. Nothing like a cold satisfying Coke at 10 miles. Just the right amount of sugar, caffeine and pleasure; which can keep me going for another 10 miles. Add some potato chips and I will run 30 miles. Don’t even get me started on doughnuts.
  3. After 28.5 miles. Nothing tastes better.Beer – it’s an acceptable post-run beverage. I am a man of rewards and beer is one of those rewards that can keep me moving forward. Knowing that a cold frosty bottle of brew; which has my name on it, makes those last few miles bearable. Oh, there are some nutritional benefits, but who cares. Right?
  4. Shirtless running. When the sun is out, the temperature warm and the humidity is high I prefer running without a shirt. Please do not give me all that crap about sunburn, sunscreen and skin cancer. We were born to run and we were born to be out in the sun. Period. Give it a try, you’ll find it refreshing. Anton knows. (Disclaimer – local decently laws may apply.)
  5. Wear the right shoes. The right shoes for you, that is. A good running store, like West Seattle Runner, will have you try various models to help you decide what feels good. Pick the shoes that are going to support you on your adventure. I would have been nuts to pick a lightweight, minimal shoe to run 30 miles on pavement. With broken glass and dead snakes.
  6. Brooks GlycerinHigh tech material can make you day. These new tech shirts and shorts will wick (a word a runner never said in 70’s and 80’s) moisture away from your skin. This allows you to stay cool and dry. Easy to pack, carry and dries quickly. Make sure they fit and will not rub you in all the wrong places. If they do rub, get some Body Glide.
  7. Have a great support person or team to help you. These will be people who care about you and will have your food and gear ready for when you’ll need it. They can also do your thinking for you when you aren’t thinking right. Just remember to be nice to them, especially when your Demon Side appears.
  8. Know your equipment. The morning of your adventure is not the time to try to figure out your new GPS watch. Or even a headlamp. You need to know how everything works before you even put them in your pack. Read the manual and experiment.
  9. Know where you are going. External input is nice, but comes with a percentage of error. GPS watches can be off. A nice person may not know what they hell they are talking about. Memory fails. It is your responsibility to know where you are going. Know your route and make notes if needed.
  10. Have Fun! This adventure is yours. You trained and dreamed to do this. Now, go out and have some fun. And be safe.

 

 

Shirtless Running


This week my focus will be on moving into our new place in West Seattle; although I am running. At 5 fracking o’clock in the morning with Son Ammon.

Ammon is showing me West Seattle and pointing out some very cool places to check out. The problem is I quickly forget them, which I am blaming on the early morning hour.

I have been thinking about the similarities of moving and running. I realized that they share a very important principle – when you drop your baggage and excess weight your moving and running will be much better.

Ok, I know it’s a stretch.


This week I have been in Seattle finishing up on an house rental agreement. Oh, if you didn’t know, Shelly and I are moving to West Seattle to be closer to family and enjoy the comforts of the big city – like cheap inexpensive beer.

On Monday, Shelly started a new position with the Seattle School District and me, well, I have been scoping out the local landscape, which has required me to drink a few beers. Bartenders are a great community resources. They know the haps.

On Wednesday, Son Ammon took me on a running tour of West Seattle at 5:00 am. We had a good run inspite of my sore foot from running 162 miles last week. Learn some things concerning the layout of West Seattle, which is a good thing.

Next on the list is to move our stuff down from Friday Harbor and into the new house. Might happen this weekend.

Hummm, there’s something else I am suppose to do besides running, drinking and playing with grandchildren (not in that order though) – oh, look find a job. Best move that up on the list some. (Resumes are available for viewing if interested. Contact me.)

Next week I will be posting – “What I learned from running a butt load of miles in a few days.” This article will have all those cool things I learned while on the road, like all snakes laying still on the road are not actually dead.

You won’t want to miss out on that one.

image


Dear Reader:

I have been thinking, lately, about the the direction of http://www.runhappyrunhard.com. Historically this site has been an informational site for running activities in and around San Juan Island mixed with some technical information. I have also thrown in stuff about my own running.

Working on this website has been fun. Maybe even fulfilling. A little fulfilling. Not a whole bunch. My current issue is that the site seems to be stuffy, stale and dry. Like the stuff one reads to help them fall asleep. This is not how I want to write. Besides, I am a funny guy and I want to throw humor into my work. The type of humor that makes one giggle or even blow beer out of noses.

So here is what I am going to do. I’m changing the direction of the present site to a more funny and insightful one. I want writing for this site to be fun for me and produce some inspiration to the reader to go out and run.

For the more technical aspects about running I am going to use http://www.seattlepirun.com. Here you will find shoe reviews, race updates and interviews. Stuff like that.

Run Happy Run Hard will be more about my running and how I use running to help me get through this journey called life. It will make for some interesting reading. Really.

Clark


On May 30th, Clark Gilbert started on a running journey that would change his life. Leaving Vernal, Utah at 6:00 am, Clark ran 167 miles, along highway 45, to Steamboat Springs, Colorado – all in 7 days. His journey was a part of the MS Run the US Relay which began on April 12 in Los Angeles, California and will finish on September 6 in New York City, New York. The Relay’s purpose is to raise awareness and money to better understand multiple sclerosis and to find a cure. The Relay includes 16 runners who ran a marathon each day of their segment.

Just finished running my 167 miles.

Just finished running my 167 miles.

Clark is at it again. On August 31 he will leave Mahanoy City, Pennsylvania and run to Fort Lee, New Jersey. Stopping at the shore of the Hudson River, overlooking New York City, on September 4. His total mileage, after 5 days of running, will be close to 150 miles. This will be the last long segment of the Relay before the grand finale, where Ashley Kumlien (MS Run the US Relay organizer) runs while pushing her MS stricken mother, and joined by other relay runners, up and over the Hudson River into downtown New York City.

Clark is doing this to support conquering a disease that affects many people in San Juan County, as well as throughout the Pacific Northwest. “I am running to serve others” said Clark. “There are too many who can’t walk through their homes without some type of aid. These are who I think about when I feel like I can’t run another step.”

Visit www.runhappyrunhard.com for up-to-date information on Clark’s second run as well as his writings from his first adventure.

To donate to help develop an understanding and find a cure for MS, please visit http://www.firstgiving.com/fundraiser/msruntheus/clarkgilbert.

 



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