General running information and thoughts from a guy who has gone around the track too many times.

Category Archives: Running Events

Lydiard Levels I & II Coaches Certification

May 9 – 11

LYDIARD TRAINING is the most sophisticated coaching method ever developed and the most widely used system worldwide by both recreational and professional endurance athletes.

This course gives detailed Theory and Application of Lydiard training, including

* The Five Energy Developmental Phases,

* The Lydiard Principles

* The Essential Timing Considerations that prepare the runner for peak performances when it counts, year after year.

Participants learn not only the what, how and why of each training session but the Secret of Correct Sequencing that greatly amplifies the Training Effect. Coaches and their athletes will have the means to reset their sights to season after season of stellar performances. Attendees are invited to participate in demo sessions of specialty workouts.

COURSE HOURS

  * Friday May 9th:  6:30 – 8:30 pm

  * Saturday May 10th:  9 am – 5 pm

  * Sunday May 11th:  9 am – 3 pm

COURSE CONTENT

Evening Session6.30pm – 8:30 pm

  * Introductions

  * The Lydiard Lineage: A history of Arthur Lydiard and the influence of his training methods worldwide

  * Debunking Myths and Misconceptions

  * Video

Day Two: 9am – 5pm

  * The Five Essential Lydiard Principles

  * Energy Pathways: ATP, Mitochondria and Energy Production for Endurance Sports

  * Overview of the Training Pyramid

  * The Adaptation Curve

  * Starting off on the Right Foot: Pre‐training phases, Health Considerations, Leg‐Building

  * VO2 Max: Estimator and other measurements, VDOT scale and Race Prediction, The VO2 Max Interview

  * Aerobic Conditioning: How to Build a Base, the Physiology of the Long Run

  * Muscle Fiber Recruitment

  * Nuts and Bolts: Strides, Fartlek, The Out and Back Run, Progress Calibration Run

  * Hill Training: Application, the Foot Spring, Workout Variations and demo

  * Q & A and Discussion

Day Three: 9am  – 3pm

  * Essential Recovery Indicators

  * Overcoming Over-training: Signs and Remedies: Diet, Acid/alkaline balance, hormones, Illness, weight, sleep, adrenal function

  * Interval Training

  * Coordination Phase: Balancing aerobic & anaerobic

  * Speedwork and Sharpening

  * TaperTweaking and Peaking: Race Week/Non Race‐week plan

  * Racing and Pacing Considerations

  * Race Recovery Factors

  * Macro-cycles: Planning considerations. Training Modulation. Designing long‐term plans.

  * Designing a Daily Training Plan

  * The Art of Adapting Lydiard Training to the individual

  * Q & A and Discussion

 

Details

Start: May 9, 2014
End: May 11, 2014

Organizer: Lori McConnell with West Seattle Runner

Phone: (206) 938-0545
Email: lorimcconnell@hotmail.com
Website: http://www.westseattlerunner.com

WSRunner

Venue:  Camp Long, West Seattle, Washington

Phone:
(206) 684-7434
5200 35th Ave SW Seattle, WA 98126 United States

+ Google Map

Website:  http://www.seattle.gov/parks/environment/camplong.htm

Tickets

Early Bird Special $315 This is the discounted price if registered before 4/9/2014.
Lydiard Certificate I&II for RRCA coaches $300 RRCA certified coaches will receive a discount.
Lydiard Certificate I&II $350
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Just finished running my 167 miles.

Just finished running my 166 miles.

It has been close to a month since I finished my 166 mile segment for MS Run the US Relay. I have spent the past few weeks thinking and reflecting on my experience. I wanted to be really clear with myself before I wrote this summary. To say the least this experience was nothing but awesome.

My last day running for the Relay was a somber day. Rain fell the night before. The west wind was blowing in a storm towards the mountains I was running to. Unlike the six prior days, this day would not be chilly in the morning and hot as the sun rose, but just plain cold. I was to run 26.2, a full marathon. I was totally ready to go. After six days of averaging over 25 miles, another 26.2 miles would be nothing. By the time I finished the distance, due to logistics of finish line preparations, I ended up running 24.2 miles. I was a tad disappointed with the shortness, but seeing my sister Merit at the finish line made-up for any disappointment. Merit drove over from Cheyenne, Wyoming and brought Bill Sinack, the runner who would replace me, with her from Denver. Bill would go on to run 200 miles in 9 days. Bill did a great job. Also at the finish line was Ashley, Relay director and Lucas, our local running host. Thank you all.

As I mentioned my day was somber. I really didn’t want to stop. I would have kept running all the way to New York if I could. The cold storm clouds blowing in added to the sadness I was feeling. Good bye sunshine. Leaving the Relay was a total bummer for me. I was having so much fun – much like a summer camp for crazy adult runners. I missed Shelly. I missed Ammon and his family. I missed my friends. I missed so many aspects of my life, but found such a quiet that my soul really started craving more quiet. My sister, Carla, asked me what I like most about running for 7 days. I needed to think for a moment and then I replied “the quiet of the open road”. Just being on the road, running. Putting one foot in front of the other. That’s all I had to do. My mind thought about so many things and then the quiet seeped in. I began to think of nothing. This was such a cool experience, an experience that I have found to be most hard in explaining. I think this is what meditation is design to do, quiet the mind. I experienced an intense feeling of mental peace. This was what running this long road gave me – a sense of peace.

As I reflect back on my week of running for the Relay I have a huge sense of gratitude. No just for running. For Shelly who re-designed how we ate so I would have the daily energy to run as many training miles as I did, which allowed me to kick some butt. From the very beginning of this project, Shelly’s support was strong and much needed. Thank you Shelly. I have also have much gratitude for Ashley Kumlein, Relay Director and Aaron for their “handling” of me on the road. Their good cheer and dedication to my success help make this experience most special. Thank you Ashley and Mr. Aaron. You made me feel like a Rock Star.

There are sixteen of us running in this Relay from Los Angeles to New York City. These are amazing people who have gone to the road to log  their miles for the cause of understanding and finding a cure for MS. I respect all of them. I am grateful for their dedication, not just to running the Relay, but finding a cure. All of their kind words and helpful tips were appreciated.

Finally, I appreciate all of those friends and family who gave to this cause of finding a cure for MS. I appreciate the trust that they had in me to go and run. Thank you for your support.

So many people have been asking me “what’s next.” Don’t really know. I do know that I am getting out the door and logging my miles; partly to keep my fitness up and partly to find that peace.

Stay tuned.


All right, here we go for another year of the Firecracker 5,000! This popular 3.1 mile (5000 meters or 5K) leaves in front of Best Western and heads out Lampard Road, turns around and heads back to town.

Registration: 7:00 to 7:45 am

Race Starts: 8:00 am

Event is Timed.

Awards not normally given, unless we just have something we want to give away. Like an old truck.

Results will be posted within two days.

Cost: $10.00 adults and $5.00 youth.


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For running the 6th segment of the MS Run the US Relay, a total of 165 to 170 miles all in 7 days, I have chosen Brooks Running Glycerin 10 as the shoes to carry me along.

For most of this year I have been wearing Brook’s Pure Flow 2, which I have really enjoyed. I have found that my feet would feel tender and sore after a 10 plus mile run. With my segment daily average to be around marathon distance I needed a shoe that could provide my feet protection and cushioning from the pavement. The Glycerin have proven to me to be that shoe.

Here are some things I really like:

1. Fit. The 10s are built true to size and they come in 2E, which is really nice. I tend to like a wider shoe and toe box. The shoe is very flexible in the forefoot.

2. Feel. The overall feel of these shoes is plush. Very cushioned, but not soft. The uppers hug the foot, but in a gentle way. Very comfortable shoe in all regards.

3. Cushioning. These shoes protect me from the hard pavement. I wore them in a 50 mile race on crushed gravel and the 10s did a great job. My feet didn’t hurt when I was finished. Which was nice. I feel like they do a good job in cushioning and they don’t feel soft or squishy.

4. Quality. Like all Brooks products that I have owned and wore, the quality of this shoe is excellent. A very good product for the price.

While I am running my 170 mile running segment, I am taking two pairs of the 10s, planning on alternating them from day to day. What is nice for me is knowing that my feet are going to be protected and that the Brooks Glycerin 10s have my back.


First of all, I would like to thank all of you who have given to the cause of MS research and education a very BIG THANK YOU for your donations. I do appreciate it.

What a week this has been in the world of running and life here in our country. The bombs at the Boston Marathon were so shocking to me. I was shocked to tears. My heart goes out to all those and their families who have been directly affected by such violence. To add to that, West, Texas is dealing with their own sadness and disbief from the explosion that rocked their town. My heart goes out to them as well.
Here on San Juan Island live has been quiet. Seems all I do is to run, go to work and run some more. Shelly is most wonderful in her support and ensuring that I am getting my nutritional needs met.
The past two weeks I have logged over 80 per week. 87 last with week, which was done with help of a 35 mile run last Sunday. My training partner, Susan, and I logged the distance in 7 hours. Thank you Susan for your help and support on these extra long distances. Today Susan, Brendan and I ran a good solid 20 miles what gave me 81 weekly miles. Nice to have some sunshine in the process. Nice to have nice running buddies as well.
Yesterday I had a brief panic attack as I was counting the weeks until I start my Relay segment. Basically I have 4.5 weeks until I start my 163 miles journey in Vernal, Utah. Wow, that’s not all that far off. This coming week my mileage will move up over 100. I plan on running 100 plus miles every week until I reach Vernal. I am very happy with how my training has gone thus far. The next 4 weeks of running should be the icing on the cake, so to speak.
Next Sunday, April 28, Susan and I will be running the Mt. Si 50 Miler. This will be good training as well. Any time running is going to be very beneficial for me.
Want to look at a map that explains my route from Vernal, Utah to Steamboat Springs, Colorado, take a peak here.
Well, that’s about it. Stay tuned to more fun and games.
Clark
ps If you are wondering what in the world I am doing, please see below.

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Clark Gilbert 

Segment 6 

 Some of you might have seen on my web site (www.runhappyrunhard.com) or on the various social media networks that I have taken on a new challenge in 2013.  I have joined forces with MS Run the US to raise awareness and funds to END MS.  Read about it here ===>  http://www.msruntheus.com/clarkgilbert/

 On May 24, 2013 I will be running the first of my seventh back-to-back marathons starting in Vernal, UT and concluding in Steam Boat Springs, CO on the  May 30th.

 Crazy right?

 I know.

 It’s definitely not for everyone, however, I feel extremely fortunate that I am in excellent health (all though some might wonder about my mental health) and I am running both long and hard to prepare myself for this epic adventure while representing an incredible charity.

 Along with my pledge to run 7 marathons I have taken on the challenge of fundraising a minimum of $10,000.   (This is where I need your help).

 I am asking all of you for the following help:

  1. Make a Donation Today: http://www.msruntheus.com/clarkgilbert/ any amount can and will help because 100% of your donation goes to MS Research and Education.  Checks can be sent to P.O. Box 3198, FH, WA 98250.
  2. Share this E-mail: please send this e-mail on to as many of your friends + family as possible.  The broader net we can cast the more people we can reach and the stronger we can grow.
  3. Post on Facebook: “I just donated to, Clark Gilbert, MS Run the US 2013 Relay Runner. Learn more here ===> http://www.msruntheus.com/clarkgilbert/“.  Copy and paste the sentence before into your status update to help spread the word!
  1. Lend Me Your Network: $10,000 is a large amount of money and I am not expecting my small group of friends and family to donate all of that cash.  I am hoping that we can all look inside our hearts, find the one thing we all have in common, compassion. I appeal to all of you to share with me anyone or any company that might be interested in becoming involved with my crazy adventure and MS Run the US.

I am very excited about this new adventure and working with MS Run the US. I can’t wait to share it with all of you as I share my experiences leading up, during and after my run.  Any help you can provide to myself and MS Run the US is greatly appreciated. Check out my journey at www.runhappyrunhard.com or www.seattlepirun.com.


Last week, which ended on Sunday March 31, was a positive week for me. Here are my stats:

Weekly Miles: 68

Time Ran: 13:57

Calories Burned while running: 14,136

Longest Run: 30 miles

I changed my training this week to a more traditional short/long method. I run a short or recovery run of six miles on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. On Tuesday and Thursday I ran longer for 12 miles. On Saturday I ran the Gorge Waterfall 50K, which was a tad short. I figured I still ran around 30 miles.

This type of training is similar to my approach to how I plan to run 163 miles in 7 days, the length of my MS Run the US Relaysegment. My plan is to run 30 miles (spilt into two runs) on the odd days and 17 miles on the even days an average of 23 daily miles over 7 days. I am hoping that the shorter days will provide me with adequate recovery.

This past week of running short/long days was a good thing. The shorter, recovery days provided relief of both body and spirit, which is really important. If my spirits aren’t up, then it’s harder to get out the door.

Highlights.

  • Finished the Gorge Waterfall 50K. My goal was to finish in the 6 to 7 hour range, but missed by 25 minutes. Still, the experience was positive. I was also able to experiment with my eating plan. I am still looking for something that will work with my stomach on these longer runs, while replenishing my energy.
  • Weight loss continues with my new way of eating, which started on March 1. Part of my reasoning to participate in the Relay was that this would force me to deal with my weight issues. So far so good. I am down 26 pounds since January 1. I feel better and have more energy. I feel like my eating is supporting my running rather than my running keeping my eating in check.
  • Every Monday night is running American Camp Trails with my running buddies, who are all younger and faster than me. For the past couple of years I have needed to walk up the steep backside trail to Mt. Finlayson. This has been frustrating for me as I use to run up with no problem. This week was my third week in a row of running up this steep trail. I am happy about that.

Running Schedule for April 1 – 7th.

Monday – 7 miles on trails

Tuesday – 14 miles

Wednesday – 7 miles

Thursday – 14 miles

Friday – 7 miles

Saturday – Rest/Recover Day

Sunday – 30 miles

Total: 79 miles.

I would like to thank all those who have given to help me reach my goal of running $10,000. It seems like a long way to go, but . . . so is 163 miles, but it can be done.

Hope you all have a great week!

Clark

Donate Today I would appreciate it as well as those suffering from the effects of MS.


Today is February 17, 2013. It’s a Sunday. The sky is partly cloudy. No rain. Yeah for that.

Yesterday I posted my intent on running a relay segment for MS Run the US, a fundraiser for multiple sclerosis research and eduction. I am very excited to participate in this relay. Honored too. Some people have passed comments along to me that tell me I am insane. Such comments remind me that I am on target. This is how I want to live me life, by doing insane things.

I have Three Stages of training to get me to Vernal, Utah, where my segment starts and finishes in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, some 164 miles away. I will have seven days to complete this journey. If I don’t, the support staff will shoot me. Well, I might beg them to shoot me, but they probably won’t.

Since the first of the year I have been building my running base. This was Stage One of my strategy. Spending as much time running in the rain to prepare me for running in a very arid part of the country. I know. That doesn’t make sense. We get what we get. During the winter months here in the San Juan Islands, we get rain. Or we got rain. Stage One was designed to get me use to spending more time out running. Rain or no rain. Stage Two, which started the first of February increases my mileage or time I spend running. This Stage two has me running twice a day and running long runs during weekends. I have run one 20 mile run already in February. Good for me.

As of today I have 95 days until I leave Vernal for Steamboat. I think people in Colorado refer to Steamboat Springs by just Steamboat. I will too.

Anyway. I have 95 days. My goal is to run 1,000 miles from today until May 23 (which is also my little sister’s birthday). This plan averages 10.5 miles per day for the next 95 days. That’s doable. I will be running many days where my mileage will be over 20 miles. I will need to get use to that much distance as my relay segment is about 24 miles per day. I have trained like this before when I ran my first 50 miler. It worked then. I am hoping it will work for me again.

If I count all the mileage I have all ready ran this year (240) and add it to the 1,000 goal miles, I will have 1240 miles by the time I start for Steamboat. On paper this all looks good. The challenge comes down to GMBOTD (getting my butt out the door). I except that challenge. I do find that the dark and wet days of our winters to be a challenge for me. Most of the routes I run don’t have street lamps. Just darkness. I have a headlamp for this darkness. I also have a nice Brooks Running rain jacket that is reflective. Reflective material is good for our dark mornings and nights.

I know I will have my challenges. Mostly mental challenges that will keep me indoors. Physically I was born to run. I also run so slow that I couldn’t possibly hurt myself. My challenges are mostly comfort related. Soft, comfy chair and a good book will result in no running. (Must remember not to go to the library).

I can, as they say in Wyoming to “pull up your cowboy boots and get it done.” Actually, I don’t wear cowboy boots. That saying still works for me. I am from Wyoming, you know. Giddyup is another Wyoming term, but it doesn’t apply here. Yippee ki yah has already been taken. Hopefully when I reach Steamboat someone will shout that most famous of all cowboy sayings “Whooooa”. Which means to stop.

I do need your help by donating to the cause. You can do that by clicking I Would Like to Donate. Any amount is appreciated.

Stage Three hasn’t been developed as of yet. Stay tuned, this journey is going to be wild.

Clark



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